INCLUSIVE URBAN DEVELOPMENT

At the beginning of the crisis years the mood was introverted. Governments cut back and traded, banks were defensive and the majority of consumers waited. The reticent climate functioned as a catalyst for the development of the participatory society. Active citizens not only stuck their necks, they also rolled up their sleeves. They put their arms together and through self-organization took the lead to realize common goals. Due to the collective sense of responsibility to take care of their own 'environment', multiple value creation arose; the participation society came up with solutions for major tasks that we all stand for in the areas of social issues, the circular economy and the energy transition, among other things.

While the construction sector was locked up because large project developers mainly avoided nancial risks, a participatory movement started in society within the area development. An inclusive, complex, organic process that resulted in a reassessment of the relationship between citizens, city and government. The city once again became the property of its inhabitants. More and more citizens have become and take care of their renewed own living environment.

Because of this 'social area development' with a multi-valued indoor climate, the central position of the classic project developer came under pressure. Both when starting projects and when selling end products. These developers had to innovate to survive in the eventful market. At the beginning of 2015, a research report showed that the reason for innovation for the majority of these developers was 'the disappearance of market demand' and 'the decline in willingness to finance'.

Future perspective

The intrinsic motivation of the participatory society to develop a sustainable city does not yet appear to have penetrated everyone. Now that the market is picking up and financial resources seem to be getting easier, there is a risk of losing this organic process of area development with multiple value creation. Land positions and building plans from before the crisis are capitalized. The question is whether the community and the grown community of city makers

the city wants to return as a flat earnings model. Or do we want to further develop the city as an inclusive, dynamic, future-proof place to live, work, play, innovate and enjoy our free time? Out of love for his birthplace, that of his children and future grandchildren, Reinier (35) pleads for Eindhoven for Eindhoven. And he is not alone. The empathic developer stands up.

Inclusive urban development

As a new, empathic developer, Reinier, together with experts from the existing professional field, makes an attempt to professionalise the organic process. They do not completely say goodbye to planned development, but learn from the many insights that the crisis has generated. The development of inner-city areas is pre-eminently a complex process. Advocacy of various stakeholders, sharing of risks, the balance between human capital and traditional capital, etc .; it is primarily an organization task. For each area it is again and again looking for a new form of cooperation, with new relationships between public and private. Empathy, not to be confused with compliance, plays an important role in this. Connecting the complex process of connecting people with a conscious capacity to empathize with others forms the basis for the inclusive urban development that Reinier has in mind.

By means of a SHARED-MAINTABLE MENTALITY based on ECOLOGICAL, HUMAN AND FINANCIAL CAPITAL with a COMMON VISION and a FOCUS ON PROCESS instead of FINAL PRODUCT in a PERMANENT CHANGEAL ALLIANCE (with end-users, pioneers and a facilitating government) come together to INCLUSIVE URBAN DEVELOPMENT.Together we put our arms together and through self-organization took the lead to realize common goals. Due to the collective sense of responsibility to take care of our own 'environment', multiple value creation arose; the participation society came up with solutions for major tasks that we all stand for in the areas of social issues, the circular economy and the energy transition, among other things.

— Reinier van Abbe

 

“A dreamlike experience.”

I have come to known Reinier when he hired me to apply Tadelakt in one of his projects. It was very pleasant working for and with him. He stuck to the timing with great precision, something which is not necessarily a common thing in construction. Reinier has a good eye on the overall project and for detail. Above all, he communicates well, has a good balance in his working etiquette and humor, and informs on forehand. I recommend working with Reinier

— M.H.

“I can’t wait until the project!”

We know Reinier as a very driven and creative person. He has avery personal approach and really adapts to the clients needsand wishes. He is creative and spontaneous. I would work with him againl.

— S.H.


 
 

“Everything we wanted and more.”

Reinier is one of those rare project Developers that combine a very sharp eye for detail with the ability to keep a constant focus on the overall objectives of the project. His over 10 years of hands-on experience in a large variety of construction projects, ranging from new wooden castle floors in Russia to renovating exclusive bathrooms with Moroccan plaster techniques, provide a solid background to a wide range of construction expertise. Hand him a project, and you can rest assured that it either gets done as planned, or he will report issues promptly and accurately. He always maintains a calm and confident professionalism, and inaddition is a pleasant person to work with. 

— S.D.

“Unforgettable.”

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— M.L.